Ringley’s 12-point plan for change

We want to see positive change in our industry – read on to find out more

In a week when all the political parties are setting out their stalls and manifestos are popping up all over the place, at Ringley we have taken the time to produce one of our own.

Yesterday, we blogged about the changes in the industry that ARLA and the NAEA want to see taken up by the new government. Today, it’s our turn. Despite moves to reform both leasehold and the rental sector, there is still a long way to go to ensure that landlords, tenants and flat owners get a fair deal. So here is how we think our industry could be changed for the better.

IF a house has to be sold leasehold, ban ground rent on it. We accept that Crown land may require leasehold sale, but there is no excuse to burden house owners with ground rent and leases of less than 999 years. 
BUT
Don’t ban ground rents on new build flats or set them at zero. If freeholders have no income to gain from their leasehold properties this could lead to an abdication of care and the potential to take no interest in the condition of the buildings, health and safety or compliance issues. None of this would benefit leaseholders.

Change the qualification criteria for freehold purchases, to ensure that all buildings can legally qualify for a freehold acquisition by the leaseholders or the Right to Manage process.

Give houses the opportunity to challenge estate charges. Like apartment leaseholders, house owners should have the right to challenge unfair charges at the FTT.
AND
Introduce Right to Manage for houses on estate developments.

Hurry up the New Homes Ombudsman scheme to ensure that owners receive transparent and fair treatment.

Regulate how client money is held. Too many letting and managing agents are not subject to RICS checks which, for example, require a three-way bank reconciliation and client balances to be proven monthly.

We would also like to see a whole tranche of new legislation to right the wrongs that, we as property managers, have to deal with every day:

  • make reserve funds mandatory to overcome the problems suffered by thousands of blocks with inadequate leases. Scotland does it, so why can’t we?
  • make it easy for leasehold blocks to make environmental improvements. Currently, most cannot, simply because the leases as drafted do not allow improvements (see our blog on solar panels here)
  • make RTM costs recoverable as service charge expenditure. That they are not, simply because these costs were never drafted into leases and are therefore the fact that they remain recoverable only from RTM members, is just unfair.
  • make the right to manage transferable – a share in the freehold is transferable – why can’t an RTM be transferable too?  The never-ending process of trying to recruit new RTM members is draining.
  • legislate so that blocks that have not had major works for sometimes 50 years+ are then not frustrated from collecting the money desperately needed by the Garside case requiring them to collect slowly.  Either the owners have benefitted from buying flats cheaply (because the block was run down) or they will have saved spending any money for years.

And finally…Grenfell has been in the news this week as the inquiry has started to report its findings. In the wake of the fire and the questions it has raised about the safety of our blocks, leaseholders should not be paying for the removal of flammable cladding. They were not responsible for choosing the construction materials for their block and bought their properties in good faith.  The government could have banned these dangerous materials when Europe and the USA did – if you allow it to be sold, you should fix your mess!

There are an estimated 4 million people in the UK living in leasehold properties and, according to the English Housing Survey, 4.7 million more rent their homes from private landlords, plus all the many block managers, property agents and suppliers that keep the sector running smoothly. That’s a lot of people whose lives are affected by government policy on property on a daily basis. And a lot of votes.

Our message to politicians is that they should give that fact due consideration when they are campaigning in constituencies around the country over the next few weeks.