Heat networks: have your say

Do you manage a building with a communal heat network, or own a flat or a building that uses one? If so, you’re certainly not alone. Did you know there are at least 14,000 heat networks in the UK – we didn’t! These include both district heat networks which supply multiple sites and the communal heating systems that supply a number of units within a single building, with which many property managers will be familiar.

The UK is committed to achieving net-zero emissions by 2050 and heat decarbonisation is one of the biggest challenges.  The Government thinks heat networks are crucial to meeting this target because they are uniquely placed to unlock otherwise inaccessible sources of larger-scale renewable and recovered heat sources such as waste and heat from rivers and mines. In the right circumstances, heat networks can reduce bills, support local regeneration and are a cost-effective way of reducing carbon emissions from heating. 

The Government is now consulting on proposed amendments to the Heat Network (Metering and Billing) Regulations 2014 to make them more effective for suppliers and users. The current regulations set out rules around installation of heat meters and billing for customers. The meters enable suppliers to produce fair and transparent bills based on actual consumption  – and like domestic Smart Meters, they can drive energy efficiency savings and cost reductions.

In some cases, the requirement to install heat meters and heat cost allocators is subject to a ‘cost-effectiveness’ test set out in the regulations.  The consultation explains how cost-effectiveness is measured. It includes proposals to update the way it is assessed and describes how the cost-effectiveness tool for heat suppliers will be amended. The changes will affect those suppliers with buildings where a cost-effectiveness assessment is required but where, to-date, the tool has not been available.

The government also proposes to extend the provisions set out in the regulations covering meter accuracy, maintenance, and billing based on consumption to all existing metering devices. These requirements would extend the regulations to some heat suppliers who, at present, don’t have to comply.

The thinking here is that metering accuracy and maintenance, as well as billing based on consumption where cost-effective, are vital to delivery and help maximise the benefits of metering. They should therefore apply to all installed metering devices. 

Finally, the consultation contains several proposals clarifying areas where the current regulations are unclear and it includes a provision to support the enforcement of meter accuracy and maintenance.

The changes are expected to increase the number of customers with heat meters installed and the government is keen to hear from industry and from customer representatives.  If you have a view on heat networks and/or metering, you still have time to respond. The closing date has been extended from 12 December to 9 January 2020 because of the general election, so if you haven’t had the chance, take a closer look at the changes here.